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Vigilante Diaries Producers Receive Federal Order of Examination for $257,000+ Federal Judgement/Debt Owed to Kevin L. Walker

“VIGILANTE DIARIES” Producers Head back to Federal Court for “Order of Examination” regarding Owing Kevin L. Walker $257,000+
“VIGILANTE DIARIES” Producers Head back to Federal Court for “Order of Examination” regarding Owing Kevin L. Walker $257,000+

 After a Federal judge orders Vigilante Diaries producers to pay Kevin L. Walker over $257,000, they now must appear for a Federal Order of examination, or risk potential jail time. As we previously reported, Kevin L. Walker (represented by SAG-AFTRA) was recently awarded over $257,000 via a Federal judgement, after Vigilante Diaries producers distributed the film, “Vigilante Diaries” worldwide, where it was exhibited on HBO, Cinemax, USA, iTunes, Vudu, YouTube, Blu-ray, DVD, and other platforms and mediums, and sold/shown under various different names and languages. Producers defrauded Walker and the entire cast and crew, out several hundred thousand dollars, by not reporting earnings, paying residuals, stunt performer pay, or even paying majority of the people for their time at all, as stipulated in their contracts.

Vigilante Diaries Producers Receive Federal Order of Examination for $257,000+ Federal Judgement:Debt Owed
Vigilante Diaries Producers: Oscar Akopyan-Oscar Gold Productions, Mike Hatton-Ton of Hats FIlms, Christian Sesma, Nick Vallenlonga, — OWE $250,000 via FEDERAL JUDGEMENT

Vigilante Diaries Producers: Oscar Akopyan, Mike Hatton-Ton of Hats FIlms, Christian Sesma, Nick Vallenlonga, --- OWE $250,000 via FEDERAL JUDGEMENT

 

A debtor’s examination is a special proceeding used by judgment creditors to look into ways it can collect a judgment from you, such as using a wage garnishment or attaching funds in a bank account. However, many judgment creditors use debtor’s exams to pressure you to pay a debt.

At the debtor’s exam, you are required to answer questions, under oath, about your finances and ability to pay the judgment owed to that creditor. The judgment creditor will ask you questions about:

  • whether you own any assets, including real estate and bank accounts
  • how much other debt you owe, and to who, and
  • your employment information, including income and where you work.

A debtor’s examination is usually conducted in court (sometimes in a private room), but can also be held at the judgment creditor’s attorney’s office. It typically lasts no more than 15 to 30 minutes. Once the exam is over, you are free to leave.

Often, a debtor’s examination is a harmless affair. If you have no assets and income that the judgment creditor can grab, then this might be as far as the judgment creditor can go with you. Once it learns you have nothing to give, it might walk away. Or, the debtor’s exam can be a good opportunity for you to negotiate a settlement with the judgment creditor’s attorney, face-to-face.

Be aware, however, that creditors in some states have been known to abuse the debtor’s examination; they use it as a means of getting jail sanctions to pressure you to pay.

 

Mandatory Participation

When the creditor first sued you, you did not have to respond to its complaint or come to court if you did not dispute its claim. A debtor’s examination is different. Once the creditor has obtained a judgment and the court orders you to appear at a debtor’s examination, you must do so.

Possible Jail Time If You Don’t Appear and Participate

You cannot go to jail if you do not pay the judgment creditor. However, you can go to jail if you fail to appear for a debtor’s exam. If you do not show up, the court may find you in civil contempt for disobeying its order. If you ignore the court’s summons, it may also issue a warrant for your arrest. If you are found in contempt, the court may issue sanctions against you, which can include fines and jail time.

If you do appear for the debtor’s exam, you must answer the judgment creditor’s questions honestly. If you give false or misleading answers, you could be punished for perjury. Usually, you cannot refuse to answer its questions, unless the judgment creditor is being abusive or harassing or does not follow the court’s rules and procedures. If you refuse to answer, then you could be found in contempt of court.

At the debtor’s examination, you are not allowed to dispute the debt or raise arguments about the creditor’s judgment, including whether you feel you owe the debt. The exam is limited solely to how the judgment creditor can collect the debt from you.

How To Avoid Contempt Charges

If you receive a summons, order or some other court-issued document requiring you to appear for a debtor’s examination, do not ignore it. If the time and date of the debtor’s exam poses a hardship for you (such as a work or school conflict), contact the judgment creditor’s attorney to discuss rescheduling it for a more convenient date and time. If the judgment creditor’s attorney refuses to work with you to reschedule the debtor’s exam, then you should file a written motion requesting a continuance of the debtor’s exam with the court.

How To Avoid Appearing at a Debtor’s Examination

If you are served with papers requiring you to appear for a debtor’s examination, you can legally avoid it in some of the following ways:

  • paying the judgment off in full
  • making alternative payment arrangements with the judgment creditor, or
  • filing bankruptcy, if you are eligible.

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